'Black and bad...'

'Black and bad...'

Close-up of a Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis).

This beetle is from the Order Coleoptera and is native to Eastern Asia.

Regrettably this ladybird is taking over the world, having been introduced artificially to Europe and North America, as a bio-control method to check increased populations of aphids and scale insects etc.. This species was introduced because it munched it's way through more pest insects than the native ladybirds. They do there job well, but unforeseen by most, they unfortunately also eat the larvae of our native ladybirds, eggs and larvae of moths and butterflies and wipe out loads of good insects as well. We have approximately 45 native species of ladybird in the UK and the Harlequin ladybird puts these at risk.

I marvel at the beauty of the harlequin, but it saddens me once again, that man has interfered with nature, not comprehending the outcomes of his meddling. Reminds me of the Cane Toad introduced into Australia for the same reasons.
Ref:
Date:
20/11/09
Location:
Bedhampton near Portsmouth
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe
'Black and bad...'

'Black and bad...'

Close-up of a Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis).

This beetle is from the Order Coleoptera and is native to Eastern Asia.

Regrettably this ladybird is taking over the world, having been introduced artificially to Europe and North America, as a bio-control method to check increased populations of aphids and scale insects etc.. This species was introduced because it munched it's way through more pest insects than the native ladybirds. They do there job well, but unforeseen by most, they unfortunately also eat the larvae of our native ladybirds, eggs and larvae of moths and butterflies and wipe out loads of good insects as well. We have approximately 45 native species of ladybird in the UK and the Harlequin ladybird puts these at risk.

I marvel at the beauty of the harlequin, but it saddens me once again, that man has interfered with nature, not comprehending the outcomes of his meddling. Reminds me of the Cane Toad introduced into Australia for the same reasons.
Ref:
Date:
20/11/09
Location:
Bedhampton near Portsmouth
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe