'Teasily recognisable...'

'Teasily recognisable...'

Photograph of a teasel plant (Dipascus fullonum), also known as 'Venus's Basin'.

This teasel is a biennial, which means it lives, flowers, seeds and dies within 2 years. It is a most distinctive plant, with flowers ranging from white to a beautiful mauve colour, that bloom in rings around the flower head.

It gets it's name from the Greek word 'Dipascus' , 'to thirst', due to the fact that rainwater collects at the base of the leaves, where the leaf and stem form a little basin. Incidentally the Romans called this plant 'Venus's Basin' in veneration to her. The word 'Fullonum' is a reference to the occupation of being a fuller, or someone who used to use the flower head of the plant, to comb out wool. This is due to the fact that the flower head is covered with spikes with tiny hooks on the end. A variety is still used in the textile industry today, in the manufacture of velour and cashmere fabrics.
Ref:
Date:
29/08/09
Location:
Thorpe Perrow Arboretum
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe
'Teasily recognisable...'

'Teasily recognisable...'

Photograph of a teasel plant (Dipascus fullonum), also known as 'Venus's Basin'.

This teasel is a biennial, which means it lives, flowers, seeds and dies within 2 years. It is a most distinctive plant, with flowers ranging from white to a beautiful mauve colour, that bloom in rings around the flower head.

It gets it's name from the Greek word 'Dipascus' , 'to thirst', due to the fact that rainwater collects at the base of the leaves, where the leaf and stem form a little basin. Incidentally the Romans called this plant 'Venus's Basin' in veneration to her. The word 'Fullonum' is a reference to the occupation of being a fuller, or someone who used to use the flower head of the plant, to comb out wool. This is due to the fact that the flower head is covered with spikes with tiny hooks on the end. A variety is still used in the textile industry today, in the manufacture of velour and cashmere fabrics.
Ref:
Date:
29/08/09
Location:
Thorpe Perrow Arboretum
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe