'Hair raising experience...'

'Hair raising experience...'

Close-up of Common wasp (Vespula vulgaris).

We have two common social wasps that chase around our sandwiches, this one, Vespula vulgaris and the German Wasp, Vespula germanica. The Vespula vulgaris can be identified by a black anchor shape on it's face whilst the Vespula germanica usually has 3 black spots on it's face, together with a raised hump on it's thoracic stripe.

Of course this is immaterial to most people, who seem to be perplexed as to a wasp's tenacity at following your lunch around. Wasps are seen and feared as insect enemy No. 1 and must be destroyed at all cost. Having experienced being at the sharp end of a wasp several times, I give these insects the respect that they deserve.

Wasps of course are not all bad, and ARE a gardener's friend. Due to their predatory nature they help to keep other nasties under control, such as flies, aphids etc. and help to keep their respective population down.

Instead of being hated wasps should be loved, or at the very least tolerated, although I know I will have an uphill task to convince most people.
Ref:
Date:
29/08/09
Location:
Peak District, Derbyshire
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe
'Hair raising experience...'

'Hair raising experience...'

Close-up of Common wasp (Vespula vulgaris).

We have two common social wasps that chase around our sandwiches, this one, Vespula vulgaris and the German Wasp, Vespula germanica. The Vespula vulgaris can be identified by a black anchor shape on it's face whilst the Vespula germanica usually has 3 black spots on it's face, together with a raised hump on it's thoracic stripe.

Of course this is immaterial to most people, who seem to be perplexed as to a wasp's tenacity at following your lunch around. Wasps are seen and feared as insect enemy No. 1 and must be destroyed at all cost. Having experienced being at the sharp end of a wasp several times, I give these insects the respect that they deserve.

Wasps of course are not all bad, and ARE a gardener's friend. Due to their predatory nature they help to keep other nasties under control, such as flies, aphids etc. and help to keep their respective population down.

Instead of being hated wasps should be loved, or at the very least tolerated, although I know I will have an uphill task to convince most people.
Ref:
Date:
29/08/09
Location:
Peak District, Derbyshire
Photographer:
Neil Wolfe